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DIGITAL AUDIO – YOUR GUIDE TO HANDLING AUDIO WITH YOUR IPHONE

How high-quality digital audio helps improve your efficiency in the field and allows you to focus on the most important part of your job - telling the story.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

10 POINTS ON CLOSE MIKING FOR LIVE PERFORMANCES

Close-miking is the term we use when we place a microphone close to the sound source, for instance, a musical instrument. However, there is more to it than that.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

EXPERT’S GUIDE TO MIKING DRUM A KIT

A drum kit is a focus piece in many musical performances. Unfortunately it can be difficult to mic optimally because of its size and complexity. Each individual element of the kit has its own unique sound to capture. If you want to get the most out of your drum kit you need to pick the right  type of mics!

Jump to:
How to mic a snare drum
How to mic a bass drum
How to mic hi-hat and cymbals
How to mic tom-toms
How to mic a drum kit

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MOUNT THE d:vote™ INSTRUMENT MICROPHONE ON VARIOUS INSTRUMENTS

A visual guide to mounting the d:vote™ Instrument Microphone on various instruments.

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TIPS & TRICKS

ADAPTERS FOR WIRELESS FOR MICROPHONES WITH MICRODOT TERMINATION

Using an adapter for wireless, our microphones with MicroDot termination are compatible with the professional wireless systems listed here.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A BASS DRUM

The bass (kick) drum is the largest sound source of the entire drum kit and also the one with the lowest frequencies. For this application, the d:screet™ 2011C Twin Diaphragm Cardioid Microphone is a one of many great choices.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC HI-HAT & CYMBALS

Usually, a lot of bleed from the rest of the drum kit is also picked up at the hi-hat position so microphone choice and placement is crucial.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC TOM-TOMS

The tom-toms can be miked in the same way as the snare, but toms can have different roles in different music styles and some considerations and genre aesthetics are appropriate.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A SNARE DRUM

To close mic a snare drum you need microphones that can reproduce extreme fast transients and high dynamics.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC SPEECH ON STAGE WITH HEADWORN AND MINIATURE MICS

Auditoriums, churches, educational facilities, conference rooms, courtrooms and theaters are all places where one or more people speak to an audience. If that speaker is untrained, and/or doesn’t know to speak up in a clear and articulate manner, this can be an issue.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC VOCALS WITH HANDHELD MICS ON STAGE

Handheld vocal microphones have a certain look for both historical reasons as well as for the fact that they need to meet certain audio needs. The most obvious being a steady handgrip and a controlled wind- and pop-suppression.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC THE STEEL PANS

Steel drums or steel pans are instruments with a very wide tonal range from bass to soprano, and a tonal quality with lots of complex harmonics. This is all best captured from a little distance with a good central stereo pair.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC AN OBOE

Close- or spot-miking an oboe is very similar to that of the soprano saxophone, bassoon and clarinet: Aim the mic at the fingering holes, 1/3 of the length up from the bell, at a distance of 15-20 cm.

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