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10 POINTS ON CLOSE MIKING FOR LIVE PERFORMANCES

Close-miking is the term we use when we place a microphone close to the sound source, for instance, a musical instrument.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

10 POINTS ON CLOSE MIKING FOR LIVE PERFORMANCES

Close-miking is the term we use when we place a microphone close to the sound source, for instance, a musical instrument. However, there is more to it than that.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MOUNT THE d:vote™ INSTRUMENT MICROPHONE ON VARIOUS INSTRUMENTS

A visual guide to mounting the d:vote™ Instrument Microphone on various instruments.

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TIPS & TRICKS

ADAPTERS FOR WIRELESS FOR MICROPHONES WITH MICRODOT TERMINATION

Using an adapter for wireless, our microphones with MicroDot termination are compatible with the professional wireless systems listed here.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A BASS DRUM

If the bass drum has a hole in the front skin, this placement is the shortcut to controlled bass drum capture. For this application, try placing a d:dicate™ 2011C Compact Cardioid Microphone in or by the opening and experiment a bit with positioning, angling and distance. This will yield optimum results.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A HI-HAT

To avoid the airflow when the cymbals are closed, try placing a cardioid microphone like the d:dicate™ 4011A, 4011C, 2011A or 2011C slightly above the cymbals (10 to 15 cm) pointing at the middle.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC TOM-TOMS

The toms can be miked in the same way as the snare, but toms can have different roles in different music styles and some considerations and genre aesthetics are appropriate.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A SNARE DRUM

As with brass, a drumkit can produce very high peak sound levels. Levels in excess of 120 dB at a distance of one meter and at a few cm from a drum or cymbal head 140 dB or more are not unusual.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC SPEECH ON STAGE WITH HEADWORN AND MINIATURE MICS

Auditoriums, churches, educational facilities, conference rooms, courtrooms and theaters are all places where one or more people speak to an audience. If that speaker is untrained, and/or doesn’t know to speak up in a clear and articulate manner, this can be an issue.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC VOCALS WITH HANDHELD MICS ON STAGE

Handheld vocal microphones have a certain look for both historical reasons as well as for the fact that they need to meet certain audio needs. The most obvious being a steady handgrip and a controlled wind- and pop-suppression.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC THE STEEL PANS

Steel drums or steel pans are instruments with a very wide tonal range from bass to soprano, and a tonal quality with lots of complex harmonics. This is all best captured from a little distance with a good central stereo pair.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC AN OBOE

Close- or spot-miking an oboe is very similar to that of the soprano saxophone, bassoon and clarinet: Aim the mic at the fingering holes, 1/3 of the length up from the bell, at a distance of 15-20 cm.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A HARP

The harp, like the grand piano, is a challenging instrument to record. Its sound field is complex and can only truthfully be picked up if you are at least 2 to 3 meters away from the instrument.

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